Classic R #27 Build - Final Assembly - Part 2

Go down

Classic R #27 Build - Final Assembly - Part 2

Post by comled on Tue Sep 11, 2018 12:02 am

Lots of progress to report over the last couple of weeks. I've been pushing to get the braking system finished and to get the engine to a point where I can turn it over on the starter.


Before reinstalling the brake booster I had to put the tray that fits underneath it back in. I opted to secure it with rivnuts, shown here. These are M5s, the smallest size that my rivnut tool can handle.


And here's the offending tool. I haven't been disappointed with Astro gear so far and I have a few odds and ends of theirs, including this rivnut installer and a weatherpack/metripack crimp tool kit.


Powdercoated tray, ready to reinstall under the brake booster.


Here's the brake booster, cleaned up, derusted and repainted before installation. I used left over paint from an Eastwood CAD paint kit. That paint has held up very well in my MG, so I see no reason not to use it here.


I reinstalled the battery holder and the battery. The wires connected in this picture are for the charger.


Speaking of wires, I installed this 100A midi fuse in the line from the battery to the alternator. The cable is 6AWG, sourced from prowireusa.com, and it makes the short hop from here...


... to the battery terminal on the starter solenoid. The battery cable itself is 2AWG.


Alternator reinstalled, as yet unconnected. I will be rebuilding the three pin connector, replacing the wires with Tefzel 16 strand and better quality Faston connectors, and wiring directly into my harness to avoid splices.


Since I was in an electrical mood I made up this pigtail for the oil pressure sender unit out of 16 strand Tefzel and a Deutsch DT connector.


Hey, doesn't that reservoir have brake fluid in it, you ask? Why yes it does. I completed assembly of the brake system, but I had to source a missing part, the banjo and bolt that supply the rear brake system from the side port on the master cylinder. In fact I couldn't find a source for them so I ended up buying an inexpensive brake master cylinder and transferring the banjo, bolt and sealing washers to the other cylinder. I bench bled the master before installing and it did take a while, the better part of an hour in fact, to purge all the air out. I then bled the fronts followed by the rear, making sure the proportioning valve was set to allow full rear brake operation. There were one or two leaks at first but I resolved them systematically. So for now the brakes are done and appear functional.


This oil filter is a long canister type and a good fit in the available space. I forgot to mention earlier that I had to install a 45 degree adapter in the oil pressure sender plumbing because it interfered with the alternator installation. Fortunately I had one on hand so I used it and it solved the problem.

After fitting this I filled the engine with 5W30 Royal Purple synthetic engine oil.


This OTC remote starter button is hefty enough to allow the starter to run for a while without bursting into flames, and it's about 5 feet long.

I'll be able to turn the engine over with this to confirm that we have oil pressure.

_________________
2015 Stalker Classic R/L26 in progress
2015 Nissan 370Z
2010 Triumph Bonneville T100
1977 MGB
1973 Norton Commando MkII Interstate
1960 Hammond A100
1949 Ford 8N
avatar
comled

Posts : 148
Join date : 2015-10-07
Location : New Hope, PA

View user profile http://comley.us

Back to top Go down

Re: Classic R #27 Build - Final Assembly - Part 2

Post by comled on Tue Sep 11, 2018 8:05 am

A handful of test videos from this weekend:

Turning over the engine on the starter after rotating it by hand first. Plugs out, oil in, squirt of oil in each pot, remote starter and battery connected. There was no smoke and no odd noises, and the starter engaged smoothly so I conclude that I will not need to shim it after all. All seems ok so far.



First test of the Speedhut gauges. I selected the voltmeter since it's an easy hookup and doesn't require a running engine. I wanted to see it do the startup dance. They do make a bit of a racket.



Finally - and this was the point of the whole exercise - a confirmation that the engine can develop oil pressure when it turns over. Since this was a used engine that has sat for at least  three years I have been anxious to start checking it out (beyond the leakdown test I did almost three years ago). I wasn't sure if I was going to have to prime the oil pump which would have required removing the oil filter bracket.


_________________
2015 Stalker Classic R/L26 in progress
2015 Nissan 370Z
2010 Triumph Bonneville T100
1977 MGB
1973 Norton Commando MkII Interstate
1960 Hammond A100
1949 Ford 8N
avatar
comled

Posts : 148
Join date : 2015-10-07
Location : New Hope, PA

View user profile http://comley.us

Back to top Go down

Re: Classic R #27 Build - Final Assembly - Part 2

Post by comled Yesterday at 8:12 am

This weekend I wrestled with getting the fuse and relay panels roughed in. It required a lot of aluminum fabrication. My original plan was to install the panels on a hinge so that they would drop down into the passenger footwell for easy access after the scuttle had been installed, but the dimensions wouldn't work. I'd opted a while back to use the Bussman weatherproof fuse boxes that have 10 rows of locations for both fuses and relays, and my schematic has enough circuits that it needs three of them. It may seem like overkill but I'm fussy about fire and I don't want to be dealing with a lot of overloaded switches and wiring. So I worked on a new plan to fit the three boxes.


Two brackets, 2 1/4" high to mount the panel to. This will recess the boxes inside the scuttle and away from the passenger compartment knee area.


Front bracket gets a row of rivnuts along the bottom edge.


Fuse and relay panel with cutouts for the Bussman boxes. It's not super neat unfortunately. I find this sort of work hard to keep under control. The cutouts were made with a hand nibbler.


And magically it's done because I forgot to take a lot of photos en route. I'm proud of the riveting work. It's the first time I've tried it and it worked out ok after a few practice shots on some scraps of 16 gauge 6061 but it does call for enormous care and concentration. Dismantled, (except for the riveted parts) all of the panel parts will fit in the powdercoating oven for finishing later.


Here's the panel roughed in on the passenger side. It needs a bit of cleanup especially on the outboard edge where the rear bracket isn't quite at right angles to the panel but you get the idea.


Bussman boxes installed for a trial run in place.

I also spent some time going over the schematic and checking the engine harness. I found out that the ECU signals for controlling the fan are not exposed so I've got to come up with some sort of fan controller arrangement. It bothers me that I've already got two temperature senders, one for the the ECU and one for the temperature gauge, but if I'd realized this earlier I would have added another port on the water neck for a third one.

Options: 1) expose the ECU signals and use them. 2) Add another temp sender and single stage controller 3) Find a single stage controller that works off the temperature gauge sender 4) Design something analog or MCU-based to do the job.

I like options 3 and 4.

A bit of rooting around online turned up the Dakota Digital PAC-2750 ($120) which would fit the bill for option 3, and it supports OBD-II if you buy the extra interface (a further $100). It all seems a bit steep just to turn the fan on and off.



It seems like overkill and it's quite big: over 4 inches wide. Where am I going find that kind of room under the scuttle (or in the cabin for that matter, which is where the manual says it is supposed to be mounted). I need something a bit simpler. I may have to design something myself. I've got an MCU running other stuff for the multifunction gauge so this could perhaps be made part of that package if there's enough code space and I/O left.

In other irritating news, two items of interest. First, my engine harness has the wrong fuel injector connectors on it. The L26 3800 has EV6 fuel injectors; mine shipped with multec connectors. I ordered multec to EV6 adapters for now from Racetronix but they shipped the wrong ones. So that's on hold until I can get hold of Racetronix to sort it out, which is proving tough as they're not answering my emails.

I'm leaning towards making a new engine harness over the winter, but I'll start with the kit one and see where it takes me.

The second item of irritation is that the boots on my steering rack have holes in them I noticed a lot of grease on the outside of the boot and on further inspection found two neat perforations on each boot, almost like vampire bites if you've ever had one of those. Vent holes perhaps, to balance the air pressure in the boot when it compresses? Beats me. I don't know if they're supposed to be there or not but I'm sure that would constitute an inspection fail here in PA so they'll need to be replaced. I ordered new ones from Coleman's web site (RP-120-B). More expense and shipping overhead. I hope they don't have the holes too.


_________________
2015 Stalker Classic R/L26 in progress
2015 Nissan 370Z
2010 Triumph Bonneville T100
1977 MGB
1973 Norton Commando MkII Interstate
1960 Hammond A100
1949 Ford 8N
avatar
comled

Posts : 148
Join date : 2015-10-07
Location : New Hope, PA

View user profile http://comley.us

Back to top Go down

Re: Classic R #27 Build - Final Assembly - Part 2

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum