Racing classes in NASA or SCCA?

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Racing classes in NASA or SCCA?

Post by Ted FM 13 on Thu Mar 10, 2016 2:38 am

Anyone road race w/ either SCCA or NASA?  

I’m adding a full cage, fuel cell,  fire system (and ??? not sure what else) just for my own piece of mind and some track days.  So I’m thinking I’m about there for passing tech for NASA or SCCA road racing.  Not sure what class I’d be in.  Anyone know?  Here’s  where I think I might end up:

SCCA:  If I tried to blow one by the techs, I might sneak into Production , (probably E Production) if they buy that it’s actually a Lotus 7 (which they should not).   From the SCCA GCR (http://www.scca.com/pages/car-classifications-and-groups)

PRODUCTION
Series produced cars, which are allowed a range of performance modifications while retaining their original design, structure and drive layout. There is no age limit, such as Showroom Stock, so Production includes many cars as old as 50 years and as new as current body styles. The three performance potential based classes include: E Production (EP), F Production (FP) and H Production (HP).
EP is the fastest of the Production classes with HP running the slowest in the category. Several cars in the Production classes can be run in more than one class, just by changing the engine between races. The ease of engine changes allows many Production drivers to enter more than one class at the Runoffs each year. Cars included in Production classes come from a diverse group ranging from the MG Midget, Turner, Fiat X1/9, Alfa Romeo Spyder, Austin Healey Sprite, and Lotus Super 7  to the BMW 325, Mazda Miata, RX-7, Nissan 240, Honda Civic, Suzuki Swift GTI and Toyota MR-2.
More likely they would class it as (maybe GT-2 or 3?)

GRAND TOURING
GT cars are purpose-built, highly modified “silhouette” replicas of series-produced sports sedans. GT cars are permitted tube-frame chassis with performance being equalized by allowing cars with smaller engines to compete at a lighter weight. GT-1 cars are the fastest of the category, and are the closest to the SCCA Pro Racing Trans-Am Series. Several of the current front running cars in GT-1 are last year's Trans-Am cars, and many of these GT-1 drivers compete in select Trans-Am events throughout the season. GT-2, GT-3 and GT Lite cars get progressively lighter and less powerful. Cars include Toyota Celicas, Mazda RX-7s, Nissan 200SX, Honda Civics and Austin Mini Coopers, just to name a few

NASA:  As for NASA, it’s a bit more complicated (I think).  SU is a catch all open class;  ST1 might fit.  

6.  Super Unlimited (SU)
Any four wheel race car that passes NASA safety tech inspection can be used to compete in SU (note: open wheel formula cars are not permitted).  There are no maximum power limits or minimum weight limits.  Any type and size tires may be used.  All types of transmissions, chassis, frames, bodies, suspensions, aerodynamic modifications, and braking systems are legal.  All of the rules in the NASA CCR in Section 15 and 18 will apply, except, the following rules will supersede those in the CCR:
CCR 15.6—Roll cages may be built to provide an unlimited amount of chassis stiffening.
Any number of cage mounting points may be used above the six (6) minimum requirement, and, any number of additional tubes may be used above the minimum with additional attachment points to the body, including tubes that penetrate the firewall, or convert a production vehicle into a tube-frame chassis vehicle.
CCR 15.8—An electrical master cut-off switch is required.  
CCR 15.16—An approved suitable racing seat is required.
CCR 18.3—Any type of fuel or additives that are approved by the Race Director are permitted.
CCR 18.7—Tire grooving is permitted in Super Unlimited.
Front driver and passenger side fixed/Lexan windows are permitted if they are factory installed during the manufacturing of the vehicle or if they are made of non-shattering material (Lexan), can be removed from both the inside and outside of the vehicle with no tools required, and allow the driver to comply with the driver emergency exit time requirements in the CCR.  (Only in Super Unlimited)

7.  Super Touring (ST1, ST2, ST3)

7.1 Class Eligibility.   Any four-wheel, fendered/closed-wheel vehicle that passes NASA safety technical inspection can be used to compete in Super Touring.  “Production” vehicle models are those manufactured by an automobile manufacturer and must be approved for street use by the U.S. D.O.T., T.U.V, or Japanese government.  All other vehicles, as well as “kit” cars, purpose-built track/race cars, and tube-frame vehicles are considered “Non-Production” vehicles, and will be assessed the “Non-4 Production Vehicle” Modification Factor listed in 7.4.2 unless the vehicle model is listed in Section 7.5 of these rules, and has been approved to compete under “Production” vehicle status.  Alternately, a competitor with a vehicle originally qualified as a “Production” model may use the Modification Factor assessment for “Non-Production Vehicle” to avoid all “Production vehicle only” limitations/restrictions.  All vehicles must comply with all NASA safety requirements in the CCR (see 7.2 exceptions)and all of the restrictions and limitations listed below in 7.2 and 7.3 to be eligible to compete.  .All competition is based on the “Adjusted Weight/Power Ratios”(section 7.4) below:
Super Touring 1 (ST1) = “Adjusted Wt/HPRatio” equal to, or greater than,5.50:1
Super Touring 2 (ST2) = “Adjusted Wt/HPRatio” equal to, or greater than,8.00:1
Super Touring 3 (ST3) = “Adjusted Wt/HPRatio” equal to, or greater than, 10.00:1
The National ST Director will determine and publish any additional Modification Factor(s), specific limitations, and/or restrictions placed on specific vehicle models.  Performance enhancing modifications are otherwise unlimited.

7.2  NASA CCR Section 15 and 18 Exceptions
All of the rules listed in the NASA CCR Sections 15 and 18 will apply, except, the following rules will supersede those in the CCR:
CCR 15.6—Roll cages may be built to provide an unlimited amount of chassis stiffening.  Any number of cage mounting points may be used above the six (6) minimum requirement, and, any number of additional tubes may be used above the minimum with additional attachment points to the body, including tubes that penetrate the firewall.
CCR 15.8—An electrical master cut-off switch is required.
CCR 15.9—Steering wheel lock removal is highly recommended, but not required.
CCR 15.16—An approved suitable racing seat is required.
Front driver and passenger side fixed/Lexan windows are specifically not permitted unless theyare factory installed during the manufacturing of the vehicle.  Both front side windows must otherwise be in the down position while on track.

7.3  Vehicle Modification Restrictions/Limitations
7.3.1  Restrictions and Limitations for All Vehicles (Non-Production and Production)  
All vehicles must adhere to the following modification restrictions and limitations:
1)   Active aerodynamic devices and/or modifications (including, but not limited to,
computerized, cockpit adjustable, self-adjusting, and OEM) are not permitted.
Aerodynamic devices and/or modifications may not protrude more than six (6”)
inches from the vertical plane from the ground to the widest part of the right and left sides of the vehicle’s body.
2)   Nitrous Oxide use is prohibited.  Pre-existing tanks must be removed. Methanol/Alcohol-water injection is permitted provided that the mixture does not exceed 50% alcohol by volume.  Methanol is not permitted as a fuel. (see CCR 15.19 and18.3)5
3)   Sequential, paddle shift/semi-automatic, and dog-ring/straight-cut gears (i.e. non-synchromesh) transmissions are permitted, but will be assessed via the “Adjusted Weight/Power Ratio” formula regardless of whether they are OEM or not.
4)   Tire and wheel size are unlimited, but non-DOT approved tires will be assessed via the “Adjusted Weight/Power Ratio”.  Tire treatments and softeners are not permitted.
5)   Up to two hundred and fifty (250) lbs. of added ballast is permitted.  All ballast must be of solid material (no fluids or shot pellets) and safely secured in any location on the vehicle approved by NASA safety technical inspectors.  The preferred method is to use at least one (1) 3/8-inch grade-5 bolt, two (2) “fender” washers and a locking nut system for every fifteen (15) pounds of weight.(supersedes Section 15.20 of the NASA CCR)
6)   From the start of qualifying through the end of post-race inspection, vehicles may not have any adjustments or modifications made to systems that could alter chassis dynamometer readings by changing horsepower levels (without the direct approval of the Race Director.)  Any hardware that allows a competitor or crew member to wirelessly or directly connect to the ECU (or alter ECU maps) at any time during competition or post-competition impound is strictly prohibited, regardless of whether such hardware is external or internal to the ECU, and regardless of the direction of data flow.
7)   Tube-frame chassis conversion (partial or complete) is permitted, but all tube-frame chassis conversion vehicles will be assessed the Modification Factor for
“Non-Production” vehicles, and subsequently, none of the other rules specifically for “Production Vehicles Only” will apply (7.3.2).  If a vehicle cannot be driven safely, at full speed, with any of the added tubes removed, it is considered a tube chassis conversion


And on and on.  

So what's your experience?  I'll just chat up the chief tech at the next races I'm at but I'd like some background before I open my kimono.  .
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Ted FM 13

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Location : Sacramento CA

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